HIV continues to pose a serious public health threat in most countries.

In particular, low testing and diagnosis rates, stigma and discrimination, poor access to innovative treatments, a high level of late-presenters and significant variations in incidence amongst key affected populations, continue to present challenges in the treatment and management of HIV/AIDS.

To address these issues at a country level, we are actively working in partnership with policymakers, non-government organisations, healthcare professionals and people living with HIV (PLHIV) to advance solutions in HIV treatment and care in ways that are sustainable, will lead to long-term improved outcomes at both individual and national levels and, ultimately, will see the end of HIV/AIDS and the beginning of an HIV free future.


WE ARE LOOKING TO FIND WAYS AT A NATIONAL LEVEL TO SUPPORT ADEQUATE FUNDING AND POLICY-MAKING TO ENSURE THAT ALL PLHIV HAVE ACCESS TO THE OPTIMAL TREATMENTS, CARE AND SUPPORT.
 

By working together with our national partners, we are helping to drive greater access to treatments as well as a positive environment for the continued development of new treatments options and preventative approaches, to support PLHIV and those at risk of HIV infection.

Explore our Policy Papers:

Financing the Global HIV Response

HIV Testing

Prevention in HIV

Investing in Innovation

Retention in Care

Improving Health-Related Quality of Life Outcomes

Stigma and Discrimination

Ending Paediatric AIDS

Access to Medicines

Universal Health Coverage (UHC) for PLHIV

Global HIV Policy

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Our access to medicines strategy considers the specific challenges faced in terms of epidemic burden and economic status. The strategy includes all low-income, least-developed, middle income and Sub-Saharan African countries (developing countries) where the unmet need for anti-retroviral therapy (ART) is greatest.

We are playing a part in working towards the United Nations (UN) Sustainable Development Goal to end the HIV/AIDS epidemic by 2030 and achieve an HIV-free future. 

Our partnership with the Fast-Track Cities initiative is testament of our ongoing support towards meeting UN’s HIV-free future goal. 

Despite progress, paediatric HIV remains a global issue, with children disproportionately affected by the HIV epidemic.

Latest statistics show there are 1.8m children under 15 years of age living with HIV, with only half having access to treatment.